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Darien Library Cooks
All season long, we’ll be featuring recipes and stories submitted by our CSA members. For this installment, we have Jen.

Last night’s dinner was one of the best and easiest that we have had all season. We grilled some swordfish and fennel that had been brushed with olive oil and then salt and peppered and served it on a bed of red onions that had been cooked down to almost a jam with white wine, white wine vinegar and a bay leaf.Roasted new potatoes rounded out the plate.It was a nice meal for a Wednesday night in July.
Adapted from Food & Wine Magazine:
Grilled Swordfish with Tangy Onions and Fennel
1/4 cup currants
1/4 cup pine nuts
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
3 red onions (1 1/2 pounds), thinly sliced (I knowit sounds like a lot but they cook down to nothing)
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper
1 cup dry white wine or vermouth
1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 bay leaf
2 small fennel bulbs cut through the cores into 3/4-inch-thick wedges
Four 6-ounce swordfish steaks, about 1 inch thick
Dill for garnish
1. In a small bowl, soak the currants in warm water until plumped, about 15 minutes, then drain them. In a small skillet, toast the pine nuts over moderate heat until lightly golden, about 4 minutes.
2. In a large, deep skillet, heat the 1/4 cup of olive oil until shimmering. Add the onions and a generous pinch each of salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and light golden, about 15 minutes. Add the wine, vinegar, sugar and bay leaf and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard the bay leaf and keep the onions warm.
3. Meanwhile, light a grill or preheat a grill pan. Brush the fennel wedges with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill the fennel over moderate heat, turning occasionally, until crisp-tender and lightly charred, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a plate.
4. Brush the swordfish steaks with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill the fish over moderately high heat until nicely browned outside and just white throughout, about 3 minutes per side. Spoon the onions onto plates and arrange the swordfish steaks on top. Scatter the currants,  pine nuts, and dill over the fish and serve with the grilled fennel.

Photo by Bill Fields.

Darien Library Cooks

All season long, we’ll be featuring recipes and stories submitted by our CSA members. For this installment, we have Jen.

Last night’s dinner was one of the best and easiest that we have had all season. We grilled some swordfish and fennel that had been brushed with olive oil and then salt and peppered and served it on a bed of red onions that had been cooked down to almost a jam with white wine, white wine vinegar and a bay leaf.Roasted new potatoes rounded out the plate.It was a nice meal for a Wednesday night in July.

Adapted from Food & Wine Magazine:

Grilled Swordfish with Tangy Onions and Fennel

1/4 cup currants

1/4 cup pine nuts

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing

3 red onions (1 1/2 pounds), thinly sliced (I knowit sounds like a lot but they cook down to nothing)

Kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

1 cup dry white wine or vermouth

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

1 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1 bay leaf

2 small fennel bulbs cut through the cores into 3/4-inch-thick wedges

Four 6-ounce swordfish steaks, about 1 inch thick

Dill for garnish

1. In a small bowl, soak the currants in warm water until plumped, about 15 minutes, then drain them. In a small skillet, toast the pine nuts over moderate heat until lightly golden, about 4 minutes.

2. In a large, deep skillet, heat the 1/4 cup of olive oil until shimmering. Add the onions and a generous pinch each of salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and light golden, about 15 minutes. Add the wine, vinegar, sugar and bay leaf and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard the bay leaf and keep the onions warm.

3. Meanwhile, light a grill or preheat a grill pan. Brush the fennel wedges with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill the fennel over moderate heat, turning occasionally, until crisp-tender and lightly charred, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

4. Brush the swordfish steaks with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill the fish over moderately high heat until nicely browned outside and just white throughout, about 3 minutes per side. Spoon the onions onto plates and arrange the swordfish steaks on top. Scatter the currants,  pine nuts, and dill over the fish and serve with the grilled fennel.

Photo by Bill Fields.

A few weeks ago, the Library planted its first vegetable garden. Since then we’ve spotted a new friend who is *very* interested in our little garden plot…

oupacademic:

What do you call a group of jellyfish? Find out more unusual words for groups of animals.

seems like a missed opportunity to let the world know that a group of ferrets is called A BUSINESS OF FERRETS.

oupacademic:

What do you call a group of jellyfish? Find out more unusual words for groups of animals.

seems like a missed opportunity to let the world know that a group of ferrets is called A BUSINESS OF FERRETS.

picadorbookroom:

Celebrating because Robin Sloan’s Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore has just surpassed 100,000 paperback copies sold!

My favorite thing about this book is telling patrons that the cover glows in the dark.

picadorbookroom:

Celebrating because Robin Sloan’s Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore has just surpassed 100,000 paperback copies sold!

My favorite thing about this book is telling patrons that the cover glows in the dark.

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ
Pat S. literally took me by the arm to tell me about her read this week. “If you are looking for a witty, fun read to pass the time at beach or pool, look no further than Paisley Mischief by Lincoln MacVeagh. Essentially a spoof of the American WASP archetype, the story is set in the exclusive confines of Manhattans most venerable men’s club, Avenue Club, with the lead character, Puff Penfield attempting to protect the 1% from encroachment from the outside. However, Max Guberstein, flashy movie mogul will stop at nothing to gain admission to the club. Subplots include an anonymously written roman a clef making the rounds entitled Paisley Mischief which features thinly veiled descriptions of the members, a nosy journalist attempting to ferret out the author of said tomb—and all with a cast of characters that are both wacky and charming. Written with humor and wit, the reader will be reminded of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves.”
You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ

Pat S. literally took me by the arm to tell me about her read this week. “If you are looking for a witty, fun read to pass the time at beach or pool, look no further than Paisley Mischief by Lincoln MacVeagh. Essentially a spoof of the American WASP archetype, the story is set in the exclusive confines of Manhattans most venerable men’s club, Avenue Club, with the lead character, Puff Penfield attempting to protect the 1% from encroachment from the outside. However, Max Guberstein, flashy movie mogul will stop at nothing to gain admission to the club. Subplots include an anonymously written roman a clef making the rounds entitled Paisley Mischief which features thinly veiled descriptions of the members, a nosy journalist attempting to ferret out the author of said tomb—and all with a cast of characters that are both wacky and charming. Written with humor and wit, the reader will be reminded of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves.”

You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

northbrookpl:

libraryjournal:

It’s casual Friday! Your Friday fashion statement!

No laces, because that’s how we roll.

northbrookpl:

libraryjournal:

It’s casual Friday! Your Friday fashion statement!

No laces, because that’s how we roll.

(Source: etsy.com)

Appy Hour: Divvie
Price: Free
Like an ongoing, visual, chain letter, Divvie is the app dreams are made of. It begins simply enough, as other apps do, with a short user-created video sent to a friend. The real fun begins when your friend adds on to your video with one of their own. The video continues on and on with other friends and their contributions until an epic masterpiece mashup has been created for everyone’s viewing pleasure.
Only available on iOS devices right now. DIVVIE, COME TO MY ANDROID.
More information can be found here.
Every Thursday afternoon, we feature an app handpicked by our staff.

Appy Hour: Divvie

Price: Free

Like an ongoing, visual, chain letter, Divvie is the app dreams are made of. It begins simply enough, as other apps do, with a short user-created video sent to a friend. The real fun begins when your friend adds on to your video with one of their own. The video continues on and on with other friends and their contributions until an epic masterpiece mashup has been created for everyone’s viewing pleasure.

Only available on iOS devices right now. DIVVIE, COME TO MY ANDROID.

More information can be found here.

Every Thursday afternoon, we feature an app handpicked by our staff.

uicspecialcollections:

nypl:

This 1928 NYPL overdue book slip was miraculously discovered in the 1980s during the construction of the Tenement Museum. The Museum kept the card on display, stating that the title of the book on the card is “one of the great mysteries, we unfortunately do not know.” That is, until yesterday, when the Museum turned to Twitter for help deciphering the handwriting. Within a few hours, the mystery was solved. The book, which may have never been returned, was Israel by by Ludwig Lewisohn. A great example of the power of social media.

cool!

I mean, to be fair, the book was due on Christmas Eve. Can’t a library user in 1928 catch a bit of a break? That’s a busy time of year!